Merging multiple outputs to single input

i am trying to take a sequencer (regular sequencer, not micro) and output terminals 1 and 5 to another module (a micro sequencer), and have both of these signals perform an identical trigger operation on the target module.

i attempted to use a “mix” module to take both signals and merge as a single incoming signal to the target module but this doesn’t work. even though both mix knobs are at maximum value, i put a diagnostic bar graph after the mix module and noticed that it only hits the first two bars each time the sequencer reaches 1 and 4, so it doesn’t seem to be enough signal/voltage to perform the triggering to the target module.

so it appears that the mix module isn’t really suited to just signal/voltage operations, just audio stuff. i’m concerned about the apparent attenuation going on with the mix module itself, but that is another issue i’ll bring up in a different thread.

any thoughts about methods to merge trigger signals/voltages like this, without adding an arduino bit into the chain? (though i’d be interested in that too, just trying to keep it simpler). it looks like all of the splitters and forks available are only outgoing splitters, i only notice the mix module as an option for merging stuff.

if this isn’t currently possible, maybe this is a request for such a merging module: a reverse fork/branch/splitter that doesn’t need the attenuation knobs of the mixer.

Have you tried a logic bit like the double AND or double OR? Depending on whether you want either input to trigger the output, or only when they are both on.

yes, another attempt at the circuit is a split connection from the main out on the sequencer to the 1st double AND input, and i tried a splitter from either 1 and 5 out on the sequencer to the 2nd double AND input and this triggers mini seq. 2 nicely, but i still want to merge the signal coming out of 1 and 5 so that both 1 and 5 trigger the double AND when sent along with with the main seq. output.

in the “diagram” below (which may not render correctly, sorry), i can send either 1 or 5 to the 2nd double AND input, but not both…

alternately, i can connect seq. main out to the mini seq. 1 and send the trigger out of mini seq. 1 to the double AND input 1, to get the splitter out of the chain, but this isn’t the solution just an efficiency.

really it seems that the logic bit is only complicating this or adding redundancy at this time, as the result is pretty much the same as if i wired the seq. out 1 or 5 to mini seq. 2 input.

[ power ]
|
v
[ dimmer ]
|
v
[ seq. (clock) ]

• ( seq out - main )
|
v
[ splitter ] — ( in 1) – > [ double AND ] ------> [ mini seq. 2 (step) ]
|
v
[ mini seq. 1 (step) ]

• ( seq out - 1 ) ------- > ( to double AND in 2)

• ( seq out - 5 ) ------- > ( to double AND in 2)

simpler (no logic/splitter), with same desired result: i want mini seq. 1 to trigger at every step of the master sequencer, and i want mini seq. 2 to trigger ONLY on steps 1 and 5 of the master seq.

in the diagram below, seq. outs would ideally be merged so that both would perform the trigger operation, however using the mix bit to attempt this doesn’t work. if i just directly connect seq. out 1 or 5 to mini seq. 2, it triggers in sync as i would like.

[ power ]
|
v
[ dimmer ]
|
v
[ seq. (clock) ]

• ( seq out - main ) ------- > [ mini seq. 1 (step) ]

• ( seq out - 1 ) ------- > [ mini seq. 2 (step) ]

• ( seq out - 5 ) ------- > [ mini seq. 2 (step) ]

ok, it was indeed logic bits to the rescue. :smile:

used an XOR bit to receive signal from seq. steps 1 and 5, and output the XOR to mini seq. 2.

now this works. i’d still like a “dumb” combining mechanism that does this with 2 or more inputs, however the XOR bit is working fine for this application.

[ power ]
|
v
[ dimmer ]
|
v
[ seq. (clock) ]

• ( seq out - main ) ------- > [ mini seq. 1 (step) ]

• ( seq out - 1 ) ------- > ( to XOR in 1) ------- > [ mini seq. 2 (step) ]

• ( seq out - 5 ) ------- > ( to XOR in 2)

1 Like

yes the logic bit seems to be the way to go, thanks for the suggestion. i ended up using a XOR but Double OR would also be appropriate here (i just don’t need the extra on-on state to pass through here).

1 Like

Hi, @muchachotron! Can you please share a video of your results? If you post a link to a YouTube, Vimeo or Instagram on it’s own line, it will automatically embed the video here. :slight_smile:

here you go, JackANDJude, check the video for my bit chain:

2 Likes

This is great, @muchachotron :slight_smile: Please post it on the project page, littlebits.cc/projects

I love the Arduino, yet I’m always pleased to see a straightforward, non Arduino solution.

Check out this interesting lesson, Clock Division with littleBits by :arrow_right: pspeer :arrow_left: It looks like pspeer used two latches to create a 1/4 time beat.

that is an EXCELLENT lesson article, thank you for suggesting it. a lot of great ideas, i would never have considered using the latch bit in these ways.