Connecting raw electronics to littlebits

How would one go about integrating simple circuits on breadboards with Littlebits? Clearly it depends on the circuit specifics but, how would you go about interfacing raw electronics circuits with the Littlebits system? Is their a littlebit component that you can simply just plug wires into? Or could you just tape or solder the wires to a bit?

1 Like

Hi @M2112,

I think there are two well know ways and maybe one not so obvious.
The two easiest ways: use a littleBit bit, like the perf module or the proto module and a standard breadboard.
You may also like to built your own littleBits compatible breadboard, like I did here.

Does this answer your question?
best regards
7th Dwarf

1 Like

Hi @M2112,
You can connect a lot of raw electronic parts to Littlebits, keep in mind that you can use max 5 V DC and max 1 amp on the VCC connections and basically a signal between 5 V DC and GND on the signal connection with high impedance ( > 1 M ohm)
:grinning:

1 Like

Can I connect my arduino to LittleBits instead of the arduino they sell?

Hi @M2112,
Yes you can!
See this project with a combination of Littlebits and an Arduino Duemilanove … :smile:
Both systems use 5 VDC…

1 Like

Thank you, alex! Very fun project

1 Like

Hi @Julia_9610!

There are a few things you need to be aware of, concerning attaching electronics to littleBits: First and foremost, is the voltage MUST be a regulated 5 volts. That is, it should be 5 volts when the circuit is open and 5 volts when drawing the maximum current (which has a limit, but I can’t remember what it is, but the cloud bit draws 2 amps.) You will need to use the incoming power, and also pass it on to the next bit. It isn’t very hard to do, but you need to be aware of it.

Second, the littleBits system has 3 and only 3 conductors. They are, from the bottom pin of the bitSnap connector, going up: 1) a ground (also known as 0 volts), 2) a a signal, which can be as low as 0 volts (but never negative), and as high as 5 volts (but no higher.) At the top of the bitSnap is the 3) 5 volt power line. That’s about it. There are some other conventions, but as long as you respect the voltages, and keep all your data as an analog ttl (5 volt) signal, everything else is fair game.


When I don’t want to use a proto bit to connect some circuit on a breadboard, I use these things I made by cutting a wire bit in half, and soldering pins onto the cut ends of the wires, Then I can stick the pins into the breadboard, and attach bits to the bitSnap connector on the wire:

Like this:

1 Like