Cardboard Sequencer & Other Noisemakers

Hey, team. :slight_smile: I can’t stop thinking about this “Cardboard Sequencer” I recently came across. I’d like to try it with @pjd’s drum machine or @frankje’s mini-pops. I’m leaning toward using 3 inputs on the Makey Makey so it’s n00b friendly. The simplest circuit would be power + Makey-Makey :: Cardboard Sequencer + 3 RGB led’s + Arduino + speaker.

Any thoughts or suggestions before I give it a try?

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Hello @JackANDJude,
What a wonderful idea :sunglasses:
So, if I understand correctly, the makey makey module acts as a 3 trigger input to the cardboard sequencer.
When turning the sequencer, these inputs will be turned into 1 output.
But this output will be a sequence of pulses.
How can these control the arduino ?

I think the other way round would be more fun, 1 input to 3 outputs ( which can also be done with this cardboard sequencer). Then these individual outputs connected to the arduino, which will trigger 3 different sounds.

What do you think ?
P.S. Can we put this in a new thread ?
Greetings

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Hi Jude @JackANDJude Indeed a new noizmaking thread would be great !

The Beatbox from @pjd followed by the Mini Pops from @Frankje are a great start to make noiz with the Synth kit…
It deserves a new thread and will be a basis for many projects I think… :grinning:
I will go for a light sensor controlled tremolo as referred to by @Schwa_Iska for a start, I do not have a makey makey…
See Creating an optical tremolo effect
See also the noise-o-matic for some inspiration…
https://youtu.be/LPOiYrdCi0o

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Hi all,
Wow, Alex, you really did make a nice noise machine ! :hugs:
We could combine a few ideas here,
Make a motorised cardboard or plywood reel sequencer.
Using light and contacts to trigger the arduino.
Perhaps the MP3 bit can also be used for triggering sounds !
This arduino can playback looped samples and control the synth kit.
Let’s brainstorm a bit :grinning:

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Hi Jude, just give it a try !
Maybe the input and output could be connected via protobits or even a cut wire bit…
Then this cardboard sequencer can be connected to any synth input and output… :bitstar:

or this one maybe?

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Nice found Alex, this is a real good idea !
Instead of a cardboard disc, we could use an old compact disc.
And instead of brush contacts, optical or reed switches ?
And why not, multiple discs on top of each other, to offer more diversity ?
And motorised perhaps. I think the littlebits dc motor turns just fast enough.

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Hi Jude @JackANDJude,
How does it sound ? Will you also make a CD with this nice sequencer ?
I’ll keep an eye on the project page… :grinning: :musical_score:
My next project will also include a sequencer, but only with one split pin and some secrets…
:stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:
Maybe we can make music together…

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Hi Frankje @Frankje,
Reed switches is a good idea, but I will not include a motor… the handoperated sequence (forward and backward with different speed) is essential for the music…
Else it could be done by the existing Littlebits sequencer I22 which has 8 outputs and one trigger output…

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Hi @alexpikkert,
Indeed, a motor would be too much for this charming circuit.
Nothing better than to spin the wheel yourself :wink:

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Hi y’all…

Before making a cardboard sequencer, I tried the optical tremolo effect as mentioned by @Schwa_Iska see

This is my little machine, motorized with the fan. When you connect it to the input of an oscillator bit it varies the pitch, so it acts as a vibrato, when it is connected to the trigger input of the filter bit it varies the volume so it is a tremolo… I think I will call it a vibrolo then… :joy: :musical_score:
I will experiment with the disk design, the first version generates block pulses (50% white and 50% purple). Funny thing: the sensor catches reflected light from the IR LED. A white surface reflects the light and a black surface should absorbe the light, but it did not work with black or any other color on the disk exept with the Littlebits purple color… :scream:
When I have recorded enough music variations I will publish a project with this little gadget…
Thanks @Schwa_Iska !

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Yum! Can you explain the white paper over the light sensor?

Hi Jude,
It is a small piece of translucent plastic from a white coffee cup.
I placed it over the sensor to make it less sensitive. In fact the distance between the disk and the sensor was too small (appr 10 mm) and the small amount of reflected light from the purple part of the disk was also detected. The sensor is set on minimum sensitivity. I also glued a black plastic part with a small hole over the IR led to channel the beam.
It is all done by T&E (trial and error)…
:cold_sweat:

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What a wonderful concept !
I will try this one out with my synth kit.
Nice project and it looks good too :smiley:

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@alexpikkert,
That looks amazing!

I actually just came on here today because I just got the light sensor and I was going to talk about some early experiments. I’m definitely going to have to take a wack at this myself now. Very cool!

On another related note, I’d been trying to figure out how to do FM synthesis in a practical functional way for a while and I think I’m on to something. I don’t have much time to explain it right now, but it involves two oscillator bits. One being after the light sensor and another one controlling the flash rate of some LEDs. I’ll have more to report soon! :smile:

Hi @Schwa_Iska,
Do you remember that I have asked you such a project a week or so ago, to do FM modulation aka adding vibrato to the oscillator bits ?
Of course, you can modulate the VCO at the input, but there is no way to keep tune tracking correctly and to modulate the signal.
By now, I found two ways to work it out, using the arduino or to modulate the VCO, or to make yourself a bit module, which can combine the modulation wave and the tune input.
For such, we certainly need a sone wave. The arduino can generate a sine PWM or we can use brute LFO.
More of this will certainly follow shortly in this forum, and we can compare the circuits all together and make combinations :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

BTW, did you check out the string synthesiser that I’ve made possible into the littlebits environment ?

And oh, @alexpikkert, how did you manage to tighten the spin disc on the fan ?
Greetings

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@Frankje ,
I glued an M3 flathead bolt and a small metal ring on the fan…


:sunglasses:

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Hi all,
I’ve posted on the inventions page a circuit which uses a RGB led and a Light sensor circuit to make up an opto coupler circuit. You can use this for introducing external audio wave forms ( a good example is the free IOS app Brute LFO ).
At the input of the light sensor, any littlebit can be placed and the output signal will vary with the audio input at the microphone bit.
We can make combinations of similar circuits to make the ultimate noise machine with rotating discs, breathing lights, etc. :sunglasses:

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My optical machine is ready to make some music, I will however need some more time before I can publish some result… :joy:

In the meantime I have made some pictures of the waveforms from
different disks for better understanding of the music they will soon make…
to be continued… :musical_score:




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I’ve abandoned the cardboard sequencer to play with Lego, and I’m eagerly following your progress. These oscilloscope pictures are :top: .

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